Mooreanna

Tens of thousands of land mines planted by the Iran-backed Houthis across Yemen have killed 372 people and wounded 754 more since mid-2019, the Yemeni Landmine Monitor said.

The latest victim of unexploded ordnance was a policeman, Mohammed Aklan, who was fatally wounded this week after stepping on a mine outside his home on the outskirts of the western city of Hodeidah, the organization said.

Also this week, a civilian was killed in a mine blast as he was collecting plastic bottles in the eastern section of Hodeidah.

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Iran’s far-right regime believes that China is the future, and it wants to be untethered from relying on the West. But the West is perhaps weathering the economic storm better and also has different pandemic policies geared to opening up, while China is closing down. Iran didn’t count on this, and now it is facing real troubles.

Video of clashes and protests over the past week are only one part of the Iranian economic problem. Because Iran crushes dissent, it is hard to know if the videos reflect widespread discontent. What we can measure is that even Iranian media outlets, especially those affiliated with the IRGC, are no longer talking about missiles and drones but are droning on about economic issues. For instance, the semi-official Fars News Agency published an article about subsidies for basic products such as oil and eggs.

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President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Turkey did not have a “positive opinion” on Finland and Sweden joining NATO, throwing up a potential obstacle for the nations’ membership bid.
The leader of NATO-member Turkey spoke ahead of expected confirmations from the Nordic nations on Sunday that they will apply to join the Western military alliance.
Erdogan accused both countries of harboring “terrorist organisations” in his unfavourable assessment of the membership bids.
“We do not have a positive opinion,” Erdogan told journalists after Friday prayers in Istanbul.

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The land borders between Morocco and Spain’s North African enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla will reopen next week, Spain said, after being closed for more than two years due to COVID-19 restrictions and tensions between the two countries.

Spanish Interior Minister Fernando Grande-Marlaska said the reopening will start gradually from May 17.

Crossings will be initially limited to residents of Europe’s passport-free Schengen area and their family members, and will be expanded to cross-border workers by the end of the month. The local economies on both sides of the fences that slice off the tiny Spanish enclaves from Morocco depend on the crossings of goods and worke

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Saudi Arabia strongly condemned a terrorist attack that targeted Egypt’s northern Sinai, killing and injuring a number of Egyptian troops.

Five Egyptian military personnel were killed in a militant attack on Wednesday and four others were injured when armed men opened fire at a security post in the coastal area of northeastern Sinai.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs reiterated the Kingdom’s stand and full support for Egypt in its efforts to combat terrorism and extremism, the Saudi Press Agency reported early Thursday.

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one civilians in all were murdered in the single coldblooded incident in 2013. One by one, the blindfolded detainees were brought to the edge of a freshly dug pit in the Damascus suburb of Tadamon and systematically shot. The bodies, piled one on top of the other, were later set on fire.

Footage of the massacre, carried out by Syrian militia members loyal to Bashar Assad’s regime, emerged only in April this year following an expose by the UK’s Guardian newspaper and the online New Lines Magazine.

The amateur video, taken by the killers themselves, was discovered by a militia recruit in the laptop of one of his seniors. Sickened by what he had seen, the rookie passed the video on to researchers, who later confronted one of the killers identified in the footage.

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One person has died and about 5,000 Iraqis suffered from respiratory ailments on Thursday due to a sandstorm, the seventh to hit the country in the past month, state media said.

Residents of six of Iraq’s 18 provinces, including Baghdad and the vast western region of Al-Anbar, awoke once again to a thick cloud of dust blanketing the sky.

Authorities in Al-Anbar and Kirkuk provinces, north of the capital, urged people to stay indoors, said the official INA news agency.

Hospitals in Al-Anbar province had received more than 700 patients with breathing difficulties, said Anas Qais, a health official cited by INA.

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Mooreanna

Mooreanna

Hi my name is Anna writing mainly about middle east Politics / Editor /Psychologist